Arduino Controls 15kW Electric Motor

Motor control companies are scared people will use this “weird” device to slash their motor controller costs! See shocking video before they shut it down!

 

 

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    4 Responses to “Arduino Controls 15kW Electric Motor”

    1. Alexander Says:

      I just racked in $3000 by working at home with buying things on a website! You can know it too!

      ****

      That JOKE aside I literally laughed out loud.

    2. Polytech Says:

      What a bitter disappointment! Watched the entire video (still there, the motor control lobby hasn’t gotten it pulled yet) and noone got shocked! I totally expected that from a shocking video.

      What type of a motor was it, anyway? Well, I don’t know about shocking but I was also watching for a moment when the motor would have rolled away from you, but that didn’t happen either. Glad noone got hurt in making of that video :)

      Was that 5~6Hz on the serial monitor you showed? So, 5Hz commutation and about 50RPMs, did I get that right? My brains are fried after a long week – which cogs/poles combo gives that result?
      Cheers!

    3. the chuxxor Says:

      It’s actually a giant Sepex DC motor. The number being read out is rotor current, being controlled by the Arduino and a little half-bridge with a current sensor.

      Basically it’s a current/torque control demonstration using a ridiculous control plant. The current sensor is used as part of a simple closed loop controller to regulate the rotor current. Basically if the current control wasn’t there the whole board would nuke instantly.

    4. Polytech Says:

      I see, so it’s a brushed DC motor. I am curious how accurate the control ended up being – were you able to control RPM tightly (or with any accuracy to speak of anyhow). I realize it would be difficult to do on a free-wheeling motor, but it would be illuminating to know how accurate can current-to-RPM closed loop control be?
      Cheers!