Archive for the 'Twelve O’Clocker' Category

 

12 O’Clocker & MassDestruction 6: Where I Rebuild a Bot After the Event is Done

Feb 09, 2017 in Bots, Events, Twelve O'Clocker

LET’S GET BACK TO SOME ROBOT CONTENT!

I feel like this website has become the Life of Charles, what with real editorials and non-stop round-the-clock van coverage and my tenuous professional aspirations… This is not the man I know. Where has he gone? *looks at own hands*

But now I’m back, with some new developments for Überclocker in preparation for Motorama coming up next week, as well as 12 O’Clocker stories to tell first. This bouncy little thing has been going to events and demos since 2013 with hardly any changes – just switching motors, basically. It’s gotten sufficiently worn down to a stub in the past few months that I decided to do a full teardown rebuild with some new parts!

To tell this story, we go back to the dark days of MassDestruction #5, like 3 months ago… Wait, CAN YOU BELIEVE THERE’S BEEN 5 OF THESE THINGS ALREADY? THAT’S MORE SEASON THAN BATTLEBOTS please take me back greg ;~;

This MassD, I took a more organizational role, helping judge and run matches. However, this didn’t prevent me from putting 12 O’Clocker (at the time, my only working bot -_-) into the arena in the somewhat informal 12lb Sportsman’s Class, where pretty neat matches like this occurred. MassDestruction has become a popular regional attraction; word has gotten out, and we pretty much filled out the Artisans’ Asylum event room to capacity. Like, look at this photo.

This is “filming a music video using the flashmob mosh pit at your post-phlegmpunk band’s free unannounced concert” level stuff. What’s better is that the builder population is getting more and more towards being newbie-dominated. This is a great problem to have.

12 O’Clocker came in 2nd place (out of like….3?) at this event, which was great, but it did take some damage. For the deterioriating ABS motor mounts that retained the lift motor finally gave out completely, wrenching the drill casing apart under its own torque:

Oooooh, that’s not good. I finished the tournament using a found drill motor given to me by an Artisans’ member, unceremoniously hot glue MIG-welded into the remaining mounting block pieces. At some point in the final against Snek Plissken, I also lost the lift motors which turned out to be one of the logic capacitors on the old RageBridge 1 units in 12 O’Clocker just breaking off the board. I also ended up demolishing another motor pinion just like at Momocon; the most recent set of motors for 12 O’Clocker came from some 12V Ryobi drill motors, and it seems like they were not up to the task of being run at ~20 volts.

Fast forward another 2 months, and MassDestruction the SIXTH! was on the horizon.  With the promise of more rematches with Alex Horne’s not-Sewer-Snake, I decided on a quick tuneup by replacing the broken ABS lift motor mounts with MarkForged Onyx prints because of course I did. New drive motors were also on the docket.

The Rage Panel slides out from the bottom, so I took the bottom plate off, which also let me do a hardware inspection on parts of the bot I rarely touch after finishing. This level of surgery was also needed to finally detach those ABS blocks.

So new drive motors were a bit of a conundrum. When 12 O’Clocker was built, it was still common to find generic cordless drill motors with 9-tooth pinion gears and 36:1 reduction (two 6:1 stages, 9 tooth sun, 18 tooth planets, and 45 tooth ring) gearboxes. Nowadays, it’s almost impossible to find these kinds of gearboxes, with 24:1 being the most common such as being found in all of the Harbor Freight 18v drills and most other rebrands. The 24:1 boxes have a 4:1 first stage using a 15 tooth pinion.

Trouble is, 12 O’Clocker was already geared to go fast, and dropping the gear ratio another 50% would have made it impractically fast and probably burnt out the motors in short order. Those Ryobi drill motors that I kept slipping the pinion on were attempts to find more 9-tooth motor pinions to fit the existing gearboxes.

 

After some haunting online, I found that one of my usual Amazon suspects uxcell sold 18v rated 550-sized motors with steel pinions already installed. Well imagine that, a prepared artificially flavored drill motor!  So I got a bunch to play with. They certainly look like 550-size motors and quack like them. The cans are a little thin, pretty typical of a mature Chinese genericized product… I can pick them up with a screwdriver. Every possible area of cost cutting has been well optimized!  The bronze shaft bearings obviously have no oil in them, since they are a little rattly, but a drop of motor oil in each solved that.

What I did notice was that the pinions’ press fits weren’t that tight. It was actually easy to undo them with a flat-blade screwdriver alone. To pre-emptively avoid embarrassing public gear slips, I took the pinions off and repressed them with a healthy dose of lime-flavored Loctite.

You know what – I’m just all giddy at the fact that they’re motor-shaped at all.

At some point in one of its tournaments, 12 O’Clocker either fell off a Dragon Con stage and landed on its main sprocket, or I got beaned by some flying robot, because the sprocket developed a flat spot which caused the chain tension to vary cyclically, leading to some lost chain moments.

In a moment of either desperation or brilliance, I decided to use my Harbor Freight slide hammer kit with a hook end to pull the sprocket rim back out like you would pound a very reticient dent. I bought this originally for van repair, but it looks like it works for robot dent pulling too!

Putting things back together, sans battery. The Ragebridge 1 with the missing capacitor had that repaired; the capacitor ripped out a logic power trace when it fell off, so it just turned the controller off. All the caps were securely Goop’d in place after the replacement surgery. If you’re using a Rage or a Rage 2, you should do this just in case also.

The biggest problem plaguing 12 O’Clocker was its battery, which I balanced once in 2013 and never again since. The cells had drifted far enough apart since then such that two of them flatlined at MassD #5, and I could no longer revive them. This meant I had to cut the battery open and undo the cell joints to the point where I could pull the two dead cells out and replace them with fresh cells. I closed the battery up again after this replacement (the green tape is new and covers the modded solder joints) with some thicker heat shrink, and making my charger do 5 overnight balance-charge-to-discharge cycles evened the cells out.

One last mod before MassD #6 was the permanent resolution of the clamp motor coming loose. The threads in the face of these Pololu 25D HP motors had completely stripped, so the motor was really just holding on by the electroweak interaction at the end. To remedy this quickly, I just took the faceplate off, slammed a #6-32 tap through them both, and then countersunk the original mounting holes in my actuator body. #zerosigmas is best Sigmas!

If you use these motors, or any of the similar motors from Servocity or Kitbots (or the straight shit from eBay), make sure to also take the motor off, clean the area, and use blue Loctite or similar threadlocker on the reassembly path. The motor does like to also wiggle loose – this is what the “battle hardening” mod offered by Kitbots helps prevent.

So anyways, it’s the morning of 1/28. Time to….

literally all the robots

This is what I trained for.

That’s Overhaul, Sawblaze, and two lift carts in the back. With space for another smaller heavyweight, or a dozen 30lbers and tools & equipment. And probably like 27 people. Some times it’s nice to just bring the U.S.S. BROWN C. STENNIS to an event.

This time, the event was held at the Charles River Museum of Industry, in one of their large event rooms. I once again helped with event logistics including box setup and judging. Overhaul and Sawblaze were brought along for visual stimulation, which was unfortunately because the event room has neither loading dock nor wheelchair ramp, and was, of course, a New England First Floor – 6 feet up the stairs.

Running 12 O’Clocker – especially when things started breaking – and half a robot show at the same time was a unique and singular experience. I will never do it again.

Have some 12 O’Clocker matches!

The match against Don’t Step on Snek, a.k.a Snek Plissken, a.k.a Sewer Snek… god dammit Alex, pick a name already!

By this point, 12 O’Clocker had lost basically all of its forks. They finally reached their fatigue limit at this event, one by one breaking off, until I had basically a big spatula. In the match prior, the right side motor pinion slipped its press fit as I had feared, so I went into the final match (also against Alex) one-motored. Which is fine, since Alex at this point had also started to run out of motors. The finals match was such a headdesking, facepalming occasion that I’m not even going to bother finding a video.

Poor 12 O’Clocker before the finals with the forks arranged the best I can, so SOMETHING AT ALL is still sticking out ):

Well, that’s it for the event. I broke the damn thing so much that I felt like I might as well use the momentum of the event to make spare parts. As I needed to also waterjet-cut spares for Überclocker, I threw on replacement forks for 12 O’Clocker in the same run.

Tearing down the bot completely up front to replace the fork components! This is where I discovered that despite my best attempts at anti-seize grease usage, the lift sprocket’s hub had galled onto the aluminum tube shaft, so the slide hammer was needed again just to break those two apart. I reamed all the shaft collars out again and cleaned up the aluminum shaft surface. This time, I tightened all the collars as much as I could – no longer relying on clutching the lift sprocket for torque limitng, but just setting the RageBridge current limit low enough that running into itself will not cause problems.

The new forks are slightly modified from the current design by adding more meat to the areas where the tie rods pass through. This was previously where they broke, so I made sure to add at least a majority of the cross-sectional area found in the rest of the fork.

By the way, this tube-removing service is also a problem with Clocker, especially after everything got twanged far up its own ass at the Franklin Institute event. I’m going to reconsider using a live shaft with shaft collar hubs to the forks for this reason, possibly considering a more Overhaul-like tie rod and central hub approach. Otherwise, I’m going to make an attachment for the slide hammer specifically for this purpose!

And here’s the refreshed 12 O’Clocker! Hopefully a staple of many demos to come.

The Unlikely Story of MomoCon; 12 O’Clocker Returns, #weeabot Intensifies, and I Haven’t Broken Down Yet

Jun 01, 2016 in Bots, Events, Twelve O'Clocker

Momocon is a pretty big anime & gaming convention that’s been running in Atlanta for about a decade now. I’ve somehow never made it to the event – either it was inconveniently timed being the end of the Georgia school year back in high school, or I was, you know, up in Boston getting my degree in Hoodrat Stuff & Bad Things.  So when the organizers of Robot Battles and the Atlanta-area builders, including some members of the Chaos Corps, were hinting that the next event might be held at Momocon, I quietly rejoiced…..and went straight back to work on Overhaul (Which I still owe everyone the next edition of the build report for…)

Whether the original announcment went unnoticed because of the build season, or it wasn’t shouted loudly enough across the community, I actually didn’t remember anything about it until, oh, about 2 weeks ago when I was reminded by some people asking if I was coming.

Ooh…. well crap. That certainly is going to mess with my plans a little. I mean, I guess I could probably go, but it’s kind of a short-notice thing and I dunno if it’s worth flying down for just one weekend and what will definitely be a small event. And I’m not sure if it’s worth the time to drive, even if it means I could bring Overhaul and display it, bec…

hold on a second. didn’t i quit a job or something so i could do stupid robot things whenever i wanted?

Hey, I’ve spent all this time promoting #weeabot, and here is a robot event at an anime con and I’m actually debating whether or not to go? Load up the van!

But before I could do that, I had to make sure of two things. One was that I had a working robot, and the other, a working van. I’m so good at life, guys.

12 O’Clocker

I stood over my pile of small robot wreckage, wondering what exactly I could bring to the competition. I was missing parts that would need to be rush-ordered for almost all of the 1lb and 3lbers, like Colsonbot and Stance Stance Revolution. Überclocker is a wreck throughout, and I also promised that it was done for real after Franklin Institute.

Then there was 12 O’Clocker. Put together for Dragon Con 2013, it didn’t do too well because its drive motors fell off. Beyond that, the bot was undamaged. I figured in the time I had remaining between when I’d need to leave, which was about 4 days spanning a weekend, I could at least remake the drive gearboxes. Those things were originally 3D printed from ABS plastic using the Dimension 1200ES machine. Now that I had access to the MarkForged Mark Twos, I could make them from nylon, which is a much stronger material in the application.

So that was it – I was just going to repair 12 O’Clocker for now. I discovered while trying to put Colsonbot back together that I was short on Vex 29 motor controllers to have it run, so there goes that.

Here it is, dug fresh from my crypt of robots. There’s really nothing wrong with it at all that I could tell, but I’m going to fully deconstruct the drivetrain and liftgear just to be on the short side. As a reminder, the drive motors broke off their mounts at Dragon Con 2014, so the drive will be my focus.

Pulling stuff apart little by little revealed things that I forgot I had Loctited, and other things which weren’t. This was chance to correctly detail the bot. For instance, the inside bolts that hold the axle stubs to the frame SHOULD be very tight and threadlocked to prevent the axle from moving. The external retainment screws should not, in case I had to change wheels. For at least 2 of the wheels, this was backwards for some reason…

Extracting the gearbox housings…. Ouch. Not only were the motors jiggling and detached, the gearcases were cracked clean through in some places. This seemed very strange to me, since I ususally know 3D printed ABS as being quite tough and flexible. Short of the oil-based grease getting into the print and damaging the polymer, I’m not sure why this happened.

You can see that the cases weren’t just cracked, but broken through in numerous places. Here are the gearboxes entirely taken apart and ready for cleaning.

I modified the gearbox part files just a little to address shortcomings in the original design, such as the diameter of the ring gear socket and its length. I do like these things, and post 12 O’Clocker I kind of want to put some more design effort into them. They were then printed using “close to solid” fill – something like 90% density and the plastic fuses together anyway, and if you go more than that it tends to be blobby.

Reassembled and relubed gearboxes using the new housings…

Beyond that, there wasn’t much else that needed work. I went ahead and cleaned and regreased the actuator, since it was very dirty from storage, and adjusted the chain tension of the lift chain also. In all, it was about 1 equivalent afternoon’s work (spread across two, to wait for the 3D print to finish) to get 12 O’clocker back in fighting shape.

cruise control for cool & operation vanfan part II

I next turned my attention to some “deferred maintenance” items on Mikuvan that were acceptable for blasting around town, but not for any type of long haul operation. After the Great Accidental Engine Rebuild Debacle of 2015, there’s been no mechanical and driveline problems at all, but some small irritating things were left over or perhaps caused indirectly by tearing everything apart.

One of these was a consistently leaking upper radiator hose which developed during last fall & wnter. It was just inconvenient enough to get to that I just accepted putting in some more coolant every few weeks. I decided to just get rid of it for the trip, since I did not want to risk losing coolant when driving in the much warmer South. Fortunately, it turned out that the hose was just seemingly improperly seated, and the cold rubber parts did not seal as well during winter.

Next, some time in February, the front heater/air conditioning blower died again. What an inconvenient time…

Now, this thing was rebuilt in the parking lot of Georgia Tech all the way back in 2013. And I quote:

Well, okay, I did have to rebuild my A/C blower motor again, in the Georgia Tech parking lot. Remember those brushes I installed? They were backwards, and they ate through the copper bus wire after a few thousand miles. A random 200W scooter motor turned out to have the exact same size brushes, and saved the day.

35,000 miles later, those little piddly scooter brushes finally bit the graphite dust themselves…

In this photo I’ve already desoldered one, but the other definitely wore all the way through and fell off. Sadness.

I actually did not have another similar scooter motor to pull brushes from, so I sacrificed a similarly sized motor with larger 6x8mm brushes…. and manually filed them down to 6×6. These brushes were much longer, but they still fit in the same holders. Hopefully, this will last more than 35,000 miles now! If the damn thing didn’t require a dashboard pull to remove, I’d have long ago replaced it with something modern and brushless…

Beyond these two items of inconvenience, there was really nothing I could work on. I know, right?! Time to make a problem for myself.

Little known trivia: Mikuvan has a cruise control system. It’s made of vacuum tubing and actuators, and has never worked. All of the vacuum lines are cracked or broken, and some just lead nowhere or are hanging around.

I wondered again how bad things could be, so I bought a spool of vacuum line and hooked everything up the way it was supposed to go. I cleaned the chevk valve and manifolds, and also took apart and relubed (to the degree I could) the throttle cable coming from the vacuum piston. I didn’t even verify if the system was holding vacuum – just shoved everything back in.

Hey, not manufacturer-approved routing, but whatever. The servo piston is seen at the bottom right – this tugs on the physical throttle pedal based on ECU commands. In new cars, everything is by electronic signalling now, so this system is absent.

During this process, I FINALLY figured out where the last missing vacuum nipple on the intake manifold was supposed to go. It was a random vacuum line connection that did not seem to go to anything, and which caused idling problems before I found it, since it was just a big air leak. In the end, this line was connected to the cruise control system. I’m guessing it uses engine manifold vacuum to purge the system. There is a small vacuum pump (which does still work) towards the top of the photo that keeps the system on the other side of the check valve purged also.

I also found this.

I, umm. Not sure where that came from, nor what it was doing, but it’s a big M10 flange head bolt, so it definitely was doing something important. Well, time to see if anything falls off.

Anyways, the answer was yes, everything still does work. Cruise control!

It is, however, rather boneheaded. I tried testing various potential failure modes, such as setting cruise for 55mph, cancelling, accelerating to 75mph, then hitting resume. Yes, it will attempt to dramatically engine brake from 75 to 55 by just dropping into 3rd gear.

Otherwise, on uphill inclines, it will also fall back to 3rd and make a whole lot of racket and not do much. I’m guessing it’s supposed to go harder in 3rd to bring the speed back up, but it does not seem to pull on the throttle much, and instead I thunder up a hill at 4,000 RPM, and actually also down the other side, because now it wants to go faster than the set speed and is using engine braking to maintain speed.  Definitely less useful than what you would find in a modern car, but whatever, I am told the 1980s were a wonderful time regardless.

On mild hills and flat ground, though, it works great!

The Trip Down & Momocon

There were no shenanigans.

For the first time, I can say that nothing weird happened on the way down. I’m both a little disappointed and now a little fearful of what lies in wait for the return trip.

Out of an abudance of caution, I took the 95 corridor against my own advice. Generally, I try to avoid I-95 below Connecticut and above Baltimore, but it lay closer to possible bailout points (e.g. friends with couches and shops). I tried to set out at a specific time to just barely make it past D.C. before rush hour hit, but goofed up leaving – delayed by about 45 minutes, because I was actually stuck behind a garbage truck in Cambridge slowly doing its thing down a one-way street, among other issues like construction and morning traffic in Boston – such that I managed to instead hit the afternoon commute exactly, upon which I decided to give up and grab dinner, because NO.

I overnighted in Durham, NC, at the best quality sketchy-ass motel I’ve ever seen.


FREE DISASTER INCLUDED WITH YOUR STAY!

Unlike most previous conventions and robot events, I hauled the 18-20 hour trip alone this time, which means that it sucked ass and also I decided to conserve energy by breaking the trip into two days. In 2011, I tried hauling the whole trip in one shot (only stopping to rest enough to continue), which meant it sucked additional ass. So really it took me over 1 day – 14 hours on Wednesday and around 5 on Thursday – but I wasn’t sad and tired when I landed in Atlanta shortly after lunchtime.

Well here I am!

I have yet to figure out how to wrestle Overhaul in and out myself. I might make some kind of sliding rail system for the cargo area here…

Anyways, let’s go check out the convention!

As I said, I haven’t ever been to Momocon previously, despite it being an Atlanta convention. It started on the campus of Georgia Tech, but recently it has amoeba’d it way into the Georgia World Congress Center, which is a huge place. What I noticed in general was that it definitely had the “big convention” atmosphere of something like Otakon or Anime Expo, but the venue is just so cavernous that the crowd density is much lower. So you’re not jammed next to hundreds of people sporting the Con Funk all the time like the former 2… or Dragon Con, which is a somewhat different beast.

The action was largely on the exhibit floor, which housed all the gaming and sporting activities. The other exhibit halls held dealers and performance stages. It seems to me like the con can easily expand another 50% in attendees without it getting crowded, which is perhaps their idea.

Besides the animus and mangoes, there is an extensive gaming section – indie games, board and card games, on-site LAN party, you name it.

i n d i e b r o s.

A few dozen arcade marchines – mostly rhythm and music games, were set up here too. Right next to where the robots were gonna go!

Dealer and artists’ hall. Nothing extraordinary to me at this point, and sadly I did not find any Miku gear sufficiently compelling ):

What was awesome, and made me seriously regret not bringing Chibi-Mikuvan… was the “Fandom Replica Vehicle” section. Wow, such a prosaic name for Jurassic Park jeeps. This wasn’t nearly on the scale of an itasha show, which made me sad – actually, there weren’t any of what would be called “itasha” at all.

Next time…

These days I’m usually out to stalk the maker-y parts of conventions, so I was excited to see this group. They make all-3d-printed props, and have the same visual and phonetic branding challenges as MarkForged.

Just kidding, guys. Also, MarkForged, please don’t drop my sponsorship over that. I love you, promise.

I’m also interested whenever someone has a mechanical prop or costume, such as these actuated wings, which were linkage driven such that when she stood upright, they were folded down, but in this attack stance they were fully out. Constructed entire using garage tools, too!

Hay guise, why drag your gaming rigs all the way out here when you can play at home?

Alright, enough con-gazing. On Saturday morning, I went in early to set up Overhaul for display!

It was set by the entrance to the pit area, and I set up a table to display all the battle damaged parts. How were they damaged?

Well you’ll just have to watch the Season Premier of BattleBots, Thursday June 23rd 8/7 Central on ABC to find out!

-me, about 1000 times during the weekend. Hey ABC, pay me to be a spokesperson already.

You know what makes the best business card and sticker holders in the world? Tiny Overhaul action figures! Print your own today!

I was actually designing these slowly before MomoCon, and sped up the effort to finish them in time. In fact, one of the last things I did before leaving was dropping by the Artisans’ Asylum to pick up 3D prints for the 2nd and 3rd one.

Saturday was the “Microbattles” ants and beetles tournament, where we had 6 in each weight class. I didn’t have an entry, so I just hung around the pit area as pit boss and general event help. The audience was quite steady throughout the event. As usual, the little bots are a bit hard to see up on the stage, so I think a lot of folks didn’t quite “get it”. I did talk to many people about BattleBots, Overhaul in particular, and some other bot talk.

I’d say about 6 in 10 people did not know BattleBots was back on air (WELL I CAN FIX THAT PROBLEM), 3 in 10 have seen parts of Season 1 but were not devout fans, and 1 in 10 knew enough about the show and the robots to ask me a lot of detail questions. I made them promise to build something for Dragon Con.

Sunday, SUNDAY, SUNDAY! It’s “relatively large” bot time! I left Overhaul & displays behind the pit banner, figuring nobody would just bail with it, so it was quick to set back up.

Here’s 12 O’Clocker before matches started. In addition to it, I was appointed to pilot Morrigan. Mike basically brought the entire tournament this time, with 4 30lbers and 2 12lbers.

A view from my corner, which I was manning when 12 O’Clocker didn’t need something tightened or recharged.

Now this audience was much livelier. I guess the bots are bigger and you can generally ‘feel’ the impacts more but we maintained this kind of crowd basically the whole day.  At one point, Morrigan was making so much noise that we were overriding the rhythm games and the whole arcade crowd wandered over to see what was happening, or if they would die shortly.

Additionally on display: Giga-Nyx…. err, Bombshell, from Chaos Corps. They only brought some weapon modules. Why?!

Well, you’ll just have to watch the Season Premier of Bat….

Oh, fuck it…

This thing I had been looking forward to. The newest kinetic bedlam from Dale, T-Boner (hhhehehehhehehe) has a scissor-action flipper driven by roughly the same mechanism  as the larger Overthruster. I have an eternal robot crush on KE-powered (flywheel) flippers, but have yet to produce a design. Better yet, it’s also all-brushless, using the same SimonK-enabled ESCs that I run on Stance Stance Revolution and a couple of other people use on other small bots.

So how did 12 O’Clocker do? Actually quite great. I went 2/2, winning against Dingleframus and Hypnus, and losing to Tetanus Shot aaaaaaaaand…. T-Boner. Of course I did. There was a lot of dancing involved, and 12 O’Clocker was a big crowd favorite. 12 O’Clocker can’t excute the “spin to win” grab-and-spin that Überclocker can, but I could relentlessly beat people on the stage over and over.

As per usual, the matches were recorded by Near Chaos, and the playlist for 12lbers is here

 

12 O’Clocker post-event. Someone in the 12lb rumble snagged on the left side chain and pulled it off, and shortly thereafter I actually lost the right side too. A little post-mortem showed that the drive motor on the right side destroyed its pinion press-fit. It’s a brass pinion on a steel shaft, so the steel shaft won handily.


Besides that, in one of the T-boner matches, I suddenly lost the lifting fork. Turning the bot over, I saw that the ABS mounts for the drill motor had cracked and the motor actually popped off the gearbox. While that was a quick repair for the motor itself, the ABS mount basically stripped all of its screw holes as soon as I took the screws out. To remedy this, I had to drill it all the way through and use some 2″ long bolts I packed which were part of Overhaul’s hardware package that I brought along. I’m not sure if I’ve just been spoiled completely by Markforged nylon prints, or if ABS was always this bad and I just accepted it, but I am so done with ABS as a material.

With my business at the con complete after another tour of the dealer hall, I packed everything back up. I’m actually taking some downtime to visit some possible housing & shop locations, since I am (slowly) plotting my move out of Boston. That means I’ll head back later in the week. We’ll see what van-related adventures happen this time…

Meanwhile,


Thanks Cassie Fray Cosplay!

Dragon Con 2014: The Wrapup, or, Operation: I FEEL GASSY, plus Panel Resources

Sep 14, 2014 in Bots, Events, mikuvan, Pad Thai Doodle Ninja, Pop Quiz 2, Twelve O'Clocker, Überclocker ADVANCE

Around this time last year, I said;

I’m back.

Somehow, and not broken down in western Maryland or something

Well, it wasn’t western Maryland per se…. but we’ll get to that. In the intervening week between Dragon Con 2014 and now, resetting the shop from its post-robot season disaster (which immediate followed the post-gokart season disaster) for the fall classes has taken up most of my time.

In addition, I’m seeing to it that the MIT Mini Maker Faire happens! In three weeks, I can hopefully roll out of bed into our own Maker Faire… but of course there’s logistics and administration to figure out before then! If you are planning on being in the area, hit us up.

The story of Dragon Con 2014 begins, as usual, with van stuffing. For expedient access to the panel slides and info, go here.

The one feature of this generation of Mitsubishi Delicas that’s saved me countless times is the squared off rear hatch area. You almost never see this any more with modern “bubble” designs, and even the two other “Van” models of the same era had cut off angular hatches (However, it seems to be making a comeback in the latest generation of Nissan Quest, whose JDM model, the Nissan Elgrand, I like way better).

I can put like 16 cubic feet straight up in the hatch area. A 18″ wide aluminum suitcase fits perfectly, oriented lengthwise, three across and three tall. So basically, the van-stuffing strategy has been, since last year, consolidate everything into suitcases and 30-quart plastic bins, pile as many as possible in the lower half of the hatch, and fill the rest with robots. Überclocker was attached to the rear left headrest the whole trip, using a spare alternator belt looped around it as a retaining strap, while every other bot was arranged creatively besides it.

This time, I stuck to my guns and just kept going on I-81 instead of even remotely thinking of touching the east coast again. Much better time was made – pretty much 20 hours door-to-door. Travelling during the daytime meant a longer sight distance, and consequently, we went faster. It’s been well-proven through the past few thousand miles of road trips that Mikuvan does well either at 65mph or less… or at 75+mph, where the engine is operating in its powerband in 4th gear… guess which half was used more often?

Well, when we could manage anyway. Summer is construction season all-around, and starting from Connecticut onwards south, there was construction and construction slowdowns and delays in literally every state.

After taking most of Wednesday morning and early afternoon to recuperate, we hit up the Invention Studio again, basically the robots & cosplay forward operating base of this whole trip. I began the final assembly of Pop Quiz, which was started the weekend before departure.  I had already done most of the work, so it was literally just throwing the package together. Pictured is the final arrangement of the components before the top was closed up.

I was originally planning on running 14.8 volts with the two 2S 500mAh packs, but some tachometry on the old motor showed me that it was basically 1000 rpm/V. I decided immediately to drop back to 7.4V and 1Ah – kind of a ridiculous amount of battery for a 1lb bot, but it would keep the weapon motor at a sane speed/load and also not make the 6V-rated Pololu drive motors too unhappy.

The batteries are wired in hard-parallel, so if I ever wanted to charge this pack properly, I’d need a two-parallel 2S battery splitter like this.

The two Vextrollers are de-cased and stacked on top of each other using clear heat shrink tubing for insulation. Stuffed right next to it is the 12 amp brushless ESC, which is hardwired next to the Integrated Fingertech Switch.

The Hobbyking 6 channel RX is also de-cased and sits up front, wrapped in electrical tape a few times since I didn’t pack clear shrink big enough. The pins are all removed, trimmed flush with the board except the pins I needed, and tiny 26 gauge signal wires soldered to the remaining stubs. Everything is according to the initial CAD models!

Dense and unserviceable? Yes, definitely, but so are iPhones and I like to think PQ is the iPhone of antweights so………

All packaged up with the new titanium top plate! 15.3 ounces – good enough. It probably weighs 15.300008 ounces up north anyway, so I still qualify for Motorama 2015.

Pop Quiz’s ‘press shot’. Notice the missing forward left corner – by this time, it already ate itself once when I was testing against a scrapped 1lb bot frame. I had ground a radius onto the underside of the blade’s leading edge to prevent this, but on one side of the blade, it just barely didn’t go far enough! That was remedied quickly.

The shorter blade meant that even when it hit its own corner, it didn’t fly away or flip. I in fact didn’t even notice it as an independent event – only after picking the bot up when enough was enough.

Being constructed alongside the antweight work was the latest version of the animatronic RWBY Crescent Rose being built by Cynthia of Cynaesthetics. I’ll let her explain the details, but this was the ‘black project’ that kept me busy over the week/end before we left. I was employed as a CAD mule since I was much faster at using Autodesk Inventor, so I pounded out the design she handed me over the course of probably Wednesday through Saturday.

The crown jewel of this design is probably the red gear-thing on the right. It’s nifty enough to warrant its own entire post. Shown below is revision 1:

It’s a one-shot 3D printed 7:1 compound planetary gear with input and output roller bearings that translates a roughly 16″ circumferential travel (so think 16″ of rope being pulled around it) into a roughly 85 degree rotation of one of the ring gears. The idea was to mechanically synchronize the deploy, though it ended up not quite working because of the difficulty of keeping the two sides synchronized.

There was a great chance that it wouldn’t work at all if I didn’t get the clearances exactly right, such that the multiple solid bodies got fused into one… but they ended up being correct for version 3. It was one-shot printed on the Dimension 1200ES machine in the shop.

Once again, I hosted a few Maker track panels and participated in others. This year’s roster was Maker Resources (my ’2.00gokart for the masses’ panel), Electric Vehicles, and a new one on Rapid Prototyping Cosplay, hosted with Jamison and Chris Lee, in which we teach the audience how to abuse waterjets. This year, we were smart and stuff, so all the panels are kept on the cloud! Links will be presented at the end section.

Above is my Maker Resources introduction. Yeah, it was about that productive.

Doing some last touch-up on Pad Thai before the Robot Microbattles 1lb and 3lb event. The front armor was too low, causing the front to drag and affecting the bot’s traction.

A clean shot of Pad Thai Doodle Ninja before the event. It only required lifter repair from last year, and replacement of some of the spring steel armor.

A picture of Pop Quiz’s first and only match. The bot seemed to work fine on the smooth Invention Studio indoor floor, but the arena floor was a whole ‘nother story. The bot has maybe 0.025″ of ground clearance on a good day. What does that mean? It could barely move in the arena!

This wouldn’t have been so bad if it were not for the fact that Pop Quiz’s weapon motor was built in 2008. Like, I went and found the blog post that described its construction. This predates even LOLioKart. Whatever I did back then was clearly not up to the bots of today, with the amount of power I’m now running through it. For example, the central shaft of the motor is a small shoulder screw with #8-32 threads, which pretty much stripped instantly on the first big hit, shown above, with “Trash Boat”. This left the weapon motor disabled, so after that, it was just a matter of finding the right floor gouge to get stuck on.

Well, shit. The rest of the bot works great (minus the paper thin ground clearance), so Pop Quiz is going to get a re-engineered motor and a few layers of heat shrink tubing over those wheels!

Due to timing constraints, the ants and beetles were forced into single elimination (again), so PQ left the event 0-1.

Pad Thai went longer in the tournament with Cynthia driving, defeating “Green Reaper” and “Trash Boat” (to whom Pop Quiz lost), ultimately reaching the semifinal where it lost to Jamison’s DDT. The spring steel armor fended off DDT reasonably well, but it was still filled with gouges at the end.

Video of this match, from Near Chaos Robotics.

Besides the front and side armor, DDT managed to get a good shot off at the unprotected rear, which cracked off a portion of the motor mount and sliced up the rear left wheel. The broken O-rings jammed into the rest of the drive and caused one side of the bot to stop working. Luckily, the motor wasn’t damaged!

Pad Thai went 2-1 this time.

Oh god, it’s Monday. It’s the big show. It’s my yearly measure of worth, made worse by the fact that this would be the 10th year since I won a championship at Dragon Con first! No pressure at all, breh. (I won the 12lb class at D*C2004 with Test Bot v3)

No changes at all were made to the big bots at the Invention Studio, since all of the work relevant to them was done before departure.

My Hyperion 1420i charger died mysteriously during Microbattles, so I put out a call to the Robot Battles e-mail list and Facebook page asking if anyone had a charger (or bench power supply) that could charge up to 7S lithium packs (about 28 volts). Dale (of Homemade Robots) brought a 30v adjustable power supply that I ran with during the whole event.

Sadly, I did not run into Dale in either weight class, so we couldn’t do a “10 year band reunion” in the finals….

Test Bot was also at this event, and frankly, it’s never looked better.

Wait, what!? Yes, that’s the old frame and running gear of Test Bot 4.5. I sold it to Mike Jeffries of Near Chaos Robotics about a year and a half ago, and his crew has revived it into Dolos. They upgraded it with slightly larger wheels (one of the causes of its downfall at D*C events, since by that point I’d optimized TB for smooth arenas), a wedge that formerly belonged to Apollyon, and a “bot hook” weapon.

I didn’t get to fight 12 O’Clocker against it, however, since it lost to Dale’s Omega Force.

Setting up 12 O’Clocker for its first match against Served Cold…

During its last match with Tetanus Shot, 12 O’Clocker lost one drive side completely. I thought it was a solder joint or stripped gear in the custom Harbor Freight mounts – Tetanus Shot is an extremely solid bot, so metal on metal collisions are going to have much more pronounced effects.  As it turns out, it was way worse than that:

The motor just straight up cracked out of its mounting holes! Looks like the bottom of the motor mounting screw holes might have been a little too thin. I have spares of the gearcases from last year….

…but of course forgot to bring them for this year.

Well, okay then.

Returning to a classic strategy, I decided to install a zip tie ratchet on the right side. This is a cut zip tie that sticks into the sprocket’s path, so in one direction it gets sucked into the chain and locks that side up. In the other direction, it is pushed away and the side moves (relatively) freely.

I used this method a few times in years past with Clockers of Lesser Drivetrain Reliability to great success, for tenuous definitions of great. The bot could move forward, in a wide circle, and then pivot about one side in reverse. 12 O’Clocker is still a relatively formidable opponent even in this limping mode, this time exemplified by how many times I still managed to get Tetanus Shot after the installation of the ratchet…

12 O’Clocker made is 1 and 1, winning against Served Cold and losing to Tetanus Shot. By the 12lb Rumble, it had also cracked the motor off the other side, so I started and stayed mostly in the center of it to smack as many people as possible while avoiding the edges. A drive-disabled 12 O’Clocker somehow managed a one in a thousand alignment with Omega Force, and I literally threw it overhead off the stage.

I edited together all the video I had of 12 O’Clocker and have it uploaded onto my Youtube channel. Here it is for convenience;

(This is in addition to the Near Chaos 12lber playlist).

I’M HAVING FUN GUYS. I SWEAR. NOW GET OFF MY CASE.

Überclocker was the big hit of the show this time, going straight through with no losses and winning the 30lb championship. There’s nothing wrong with the bot right now – I can turn it around to Motorama 2015 tomorrow. The Banebots wheel swap proved to be an extremely good idea – Clocker had a traction advantage that was clearly noticeable in its matches with Nyx, against which I’ve always been neck and neck in pushing ability.

I also entered Clocker in the 30lb rumble, with some… additions… to epicly hilariously results. 90% of this event to me is a chance to let loose and be silly on stage with robots, so we took the spare pool noodles that we brought for safety covers – Jamison’s Bug Loves Robot and Überclocker both rank pretty high for pointy ends on bots – and straight up taped them to the bots for added entertainment.

I edited together all of its matches here. Near Chaos has a much better view of the bedlam that was the 30lb rumble.

Clocker’s performance was nothing short of stellar, and I’m glad that it finally works reliably. I don’t anticipate making any performance upgrades or changes to the bot at the moment. The top clamp arm actuator still has a bit of a habit of coming apart – it didn’t at this event, but it was looking close by the end, so I’d like to actually drive some screws into its mounting brackets before Motorama.

12 O’Clocker is a different story. Besides the whole motors-breaking-off issue, which is a design problem with the gearbox, it needs an aspect ratio more similar to Überclocker to be more effective. Right now, it’s dopey and cute looking with its short wheelbase and tall frame, but it translates into poor lifting performance since the center of gravity has less leverage. It’s more likely to faceplant than lift (but that makes it cuter and dopier!). But again, I’m not sure if I’d change this, since the point of it was to be silly and fast – two things it’s good at, at least!

I ran out of time this DC season due to helping with the RWBY weapon that I couldn’t really do justice for Pop Quiz and Pad Thai. Pop Quiz’s concept is sound, but that motor needs to be updated to 2014 standards! It’s been a while since I’ve made a motor, so I’m kind of itching to do it now… Oh, and throw a few layers of heat shrink onto the wheels. Pad Thai suffered plenty of body damage this time around, but none to the lifter – it was actually kept down most of the time  anyway.

The Con Elsewhere

Once you go to one Dragon Con, you kind of get the idea: it has neither rhyme nor reason, nor a theme such as comic books, Warhammer, or indie video games. It’s ALL of it. As a result, I’m always on the lookout for new and innovative crossovers and takes on media franchises. Seeing a group of Iron Men gets old pretty quickly, for example, but nothing really prepares you for…

Iron Totoro. The picture doesn’t do justice as to how huge it was, which was easily 3 people wide. There was a hotel security staff just off to the left escorting it through the (very tightly packed) Marriott hotel.

Interactive costumes are another cool feature of a convention where you’re not expected to stay within a certain industry or franchise. Here is Mr. Fingertech Robotics himself, Kurt, with hand-mounted reed switches that could sense high fives. The large LED screen displayed the current count (yes, double high fives work!), and the LED strips on his vest would change color depending on how many high fives were accumulated in a certain span of time.

I forgot the exact count, but he was well over 10,000 by the end of the weekend, and it was a huge hit just walking through the hallways.

Cynthia’s mechanical scythe posing next to a more artistically complete but non-mechanical one. RWBY is stll a series which is gaining traction, so not too many people recognized it immediately, but the mechanical deploy caught quite a few eyes. It was presented at the Rapid Prototyping panel (which also featured Jamison’s big hammer and a few other things) to great fanfare. Version 3 ought to be even more exciting…

So that’s Dragon Con 2014 in a few pictures! I’ve already made plans for next year, including changes to the panel format and possibly more collab panels. First, I’ve always thought that Dragon Con panels were supposed to be 1.5 hours long, since at other cons the panels are scheduled in 1 hour blocks. As it turns out, it’s supposed to be 1 hour of panel and halfn a hour of room clear/reset. What?! I totally only found this out when Val, the Robotics & Maker track director, had to toss everyone out of the panels I ran or participated in…. because I thought the content was going to fill about an hour and 20 minutes or so. Whoops.

We hustled out of Atlanta under the cover of early morning darkness, and followed the same I-81 route back.

Panel Resources

This year, I did a smart person thing (only you guys say I’m smart, I never said anything to the effect…) and made/kept the presentations online. So here they are:

  • Maker Resources 2014: Updated with new content, vendors, and internet memes!
  • Rapid Prototyping 2014: In collab with Chris Lee and Jamison Go. If the subset of people who 1. read this blog and 2. have pictures or video, I’d appreciate it greatly if you sent it our way. I think this panel was highly successful.
  • Electric Vehicles 2014: In collab with Adam Bercu. This was primarily a picture show since we actually did a panel thing and talked the whole time.

Operation: I FEEL GASSY

Well, this sure looks familiar.

Nope, it’s not a repost!

Around 9 in the morning on Tuesday, near the VA/NC border (by a little town named Lambsburg, as I found out), I stopped to pick up a full tank of gas from a Loves Travel Stop. Roughly 1 hour later, south of Roanoke, was when we noticed the first hints of power loss, but we assigned it to the fact that the region was mountainous. Shortly after Roanoke, in the span of less than half an hour, I went from keeping up with highway speed in the right lane to crawling at 25mph on the shoulder.

Realizing this was patently unsafe, I pulled off near Natural Bridge, VA onto U.S. Route 11, which was a much slower local road, while we tried to formulate a battle plan. At this point was when I was beginning to think that the problem was with the fuel system. The symptoms were:

  • Lack of power at mid and higher throttle. The engine could idle and run at low speeds and loads just fine, but as soon as I gave it more gas, it began sputtering and losing RPM. By itself, this could have indicated a problem with a clogged or restricted exhaust or intake.
  • I could rev the engine in neutral freely if I depressed the throttle gently; but a sudden mash of the pedal would cause it to sputter. Something load-dependent was the issue.
  • More surprisingly, though, it was inconsistent. During the various start-stop cycles at red lights and when the engine was off, the restriction would seemingly go away for a short time, but then almost immediately return afterwards.
  • When it was away, I could drive and accelerate normally. Something was moving or shifting, possibly by gravity/engine suction or pressure, or perhaps temperature, into place.

We went on U.S. 11 until Lexington, VA, where we stopped for lunch at a Taco Bell and waited for the engine bay to cool off a bit so I could possible look inside. I picked up half a tank of gas from an Exxon station, where I also checked the air intake and filter in case a squirrel actually got lodged in there or something. You  never know.

It seemed to behave normally right after the fillup, so at this point I was highly suspecting some kind of gunk or contamination in the fuel. I milked what leftover power it had for several more miles until the problem came back again, halfway to Staunton, VA

Realizing we were never going to make it home if this kept up, we stopped at a rural gas station halfway between Lexington and Staunton (in a town called Raphine)  where Adam and I dove under to extract the catalytic converter (after half an hour inside a Burger King waiting for it to cool) and to inspect it. This resulted in the following hilarious picture:


Let the shipping begin

After taking about 20 minutes to drop the catalytic converter, we found there was absolutely nothing wrong with it or with the pipe downstream. At this point, I was pretty damned sure it was fuel-system related.

We decided to play it safe and try to ask for an ‘expert opinion’, which involved a bit of calling around seeing if there were area mechanics we could limp to. We visited two – one was right across the highway, was actually a truck and RV repair shop, and run by a very friendly and wise old guy whose name we didn’t catch, but whose business was named Cash’s so I’m going to call him Mr. Cash, because that shit’s cash.

After taking a test drive, he agreed with me that it was most likely fuel related, but seeing as how this was already late afternoon and likely nobody in the area would have the needed parts, could only offer me a bottle of fuel system cleaner and some good luck. Mr. Cash recommended we visit another shop around the corner, King’s (which I assume is run by Mr. King), to get a second opinion.

Mr. King himself was welcoming but busy, but the mechanic he foisted me off to was absolutely convinced it was a catalytic converter problem despite me telling him already what we’ve taken apart and checked. I’ll give the guy some credit – they were busy when we walked in, and we were likely not going to stay and pay them to do service, so I can’t imagine I was very high on their priorities list. We left after deciding our welcome was outstayed. Certainly, if you walk into the IDC while I’m busy putting out student go-kart fires (maybe literally, mind you…) and started asking laser cutter questions, I would have responded similarly.

At this point, I decided to see if the ECU was possibly outputting any codes, since 1989 is just new enough that some sort of electronic diagnostic was mandatory. One problem: I didn’t have the diagnostic sheet from the service manual that told me what the blinking voltmeter needle did.

Solution: I found it on my own website – posted from last year, an exact snapshot of the page I needed. See, kids? This is why you blog everything, even if you don’t think it’s important!

I continued north on I-64/81 to wait for the problem to return while Adam carefully stared at the voltmeter. Sciencekart is funny, but I wasn’t about to try and stare at the voltmeter while driving for real. However, even though the problem returned, and I was reduced to shoulder-crawling again north of Staunton, VA, the ECU didn’t throw any errors.

Really? I figured it should at least return “Fuel Pump” or something, but nothing. Modern ECUs can tell you if the fuel-air mixture was even a little bit out of expectation, but the diagnostic system on Mikuvan is not sophisticated enough for that.

I coasted into Weyers Cave, VA – between Staunton and Harrisonburg – and we limped to the Shenandoah Valley Regional airport. At this point, Cynthia and Jamison needed a way to get home because they have things like real lives and jobs. They picked up a rental car from the airport, since there were no direct flights to Boston from here.

The battle plan was prepared. Adam and I would crash overnight with his friend in Richmond, VA, then return in the morning with a U-Haul and trailer. From there, we’d basically be running the original Operation: MIKUVAN again!

In what I realize must have looked like a broad daylight car theft, we pulled into the airport parking lot with the truck and trailer and pulled back out with Mikuvan loaded in under 10 minutes (Keep in mind it was still capable of moving under its own power, just for not too long, so I just drove onto the trailer). If we tried this in Boston, we’d been surrounded by black trucks and assault rifles in a few seconds, but they seem to be more chill out here.

The destination was a shopping center south of Harrisonburg, VA, with multiple big box home improvement and auto parts stores in the area.

And so, for the second time in two years, I found myself in a town with “Harris” in the name, under a U-haul trailer, in the parking lot of a big-box store, fixing a van.

The plan of action was to remove the fuel filter and then connect it up backwards, then use the fuel pump to empty the whole tank through the backwards filter. Ideally, this would knock out and wash enough particulates for us to gently nurse it back home, still 12 hours away. Pictured above is the first shot of fuel from the filter. Delicious.

Every few gallons, we’d switch the 10 gallon fuel can for a water bottle and inspect the fuel for clarity. Even at the end of 4 shots, there were still tiny black flakes and bits coming out of it. I know this is probably the past 10,000 miles of deposits, but regardless, it was rather surprising to see how contaminated and full of other substances gasoline, allegedly a highly refined product, can be even in 2014. At least, I’ve never dealt in any way with “bad gas” on any vehicle… but perhaps it’s because I’ve not personally put 10K+ miles on any one vehicle before now.

We dropped the bad fuel off at an auto shop, fully fueled Mikuvan with some Shell premium gas (I was paranoid okay?!) and went on our way. The trip back to Richmond, about 2 hours, would be the test – if I could manage this fine, then it should be okay for the rest of the trip: all of the instances of the fuel restriction would appear with 15-20 minutes of driving each time. I took the lead on the return, with Adam following in the truck and trailer. If the problem returned, I would slow down, pull behind him, and just Grand Theft Auto it onto the trailer.

Around 9:30PM on Wednesday, we rolled out of Richmond and headed north on I-95. I drove at a relatively constant speed and throttle, trying to maintain 70mph, until north of York, PA, upon which Adam took over and got to White Plains, NY on I-287.

I think I should drive with a clogged fuel filter more often, since I got the best mileage ever during that leg. Problems started returning around White Plains, more mildly but still noticeable, so we decided to play it safe and took CT-15 northward instead of I-95.

Here’s the story in a Google map.

CT-15 was a scenic but rather chaotic (being morning rush hour in the NYC metro area and all…) drive. We discovered new Tesla superchargers:

In the span of time we were taking a break at this station – like 20 minutes at most, three Teslas rolled in and out.


Hey, is this still under warranty?

An hour south of Hartford, I got the idea of calling area Mitsubishi dealerships to see if anyone had a fuel filter for an obscure model they likely never personally sold. I’m not sure why I thought this was necessary by this point, since Hartford was but a hop, skip, and faceplant away from Boston, but I was kind of tired and delirious anyway.

Hartford Mitsubishi (& Cadillac & Maserati) was extremely helpful – their parts guy was on the phone with me for 10 minutes trying different models to see if any parts cross correlated. I know for sure the same style filter is used on late 80s Monteros and Galants, as well as shared with the Dodge compact pickups of the same era…. but all of those are virtually extinct by now too, so no luck with those specific models. He ended up finding a ‘universal’ style that fit across model lines. I’ll take one.

We decided not to do the filter swap just two hours outside the finish, so the rest of the trip was spent hovering in the right lane on I-84 and I-90 to very little drama. I made it back onto campus around 1pm on Thursday.

analysis and recourse

I was not expecting “bad gas” to be still a thing in 2014 – sure, I’ve heard stories from other people, but come on, this is the future where we live in the cloud and download our food and movies alike through 4G LTE. I was also under the impression that fuel filters, like any filter, will show symptoms gradually, and not be fine on one hill, but completely go to shit by the next. The filter in question was installed after I got the engine working again in May 2013, and it’s been completely trouble-free for all of the trips since then. It was even trouble-free for 550 miles of blasting in and around Atlanta, where I was regularly pushing 80mph. It was trouble free for the first six hours of the trip, which featured much of the same hammer-dropping. It’s difficult for me to not mentally assign blame to the Love’s station, since I picked up a full tank of fuel from them and then the engine totally went to hell within an hour and a half.

It also seems getting recompense from a gas station is quite difficult.

First, a bunch of people would have to complain AND specifically point out they were the cause. Who knows, maybe the 6 other cars at the station with me when we refueled in Lambsburg also had issues some time down the line, or could have them very shortly after a few hundred more miles, but their owners will just chalk it up to the 5000 mile oil change interval running out and take it into their mechanic, never noticing the cause or caring about the final invoice.

Second, even if they were also broken down somewhere, normal people wouldn’t do what we did: we didn’t do a single thing “the legit way”. Instead of calling for a tow, calling my insurance company to find an authorized shop, getting said shop to perform all the diagnostic work we did, and paying for the replacement part in labor, we slum-fixed it ourselves outside of The System. The “tow” was a U-haul, the “shop” was the parking lot of the Harrisonburg Home Depot. I guess I did end up buying an official dealer sourced part? What this means as a whole is I don’t have an ‘official’ paper trail to back all of these claims up.

I called Love’s and they looked into the store in question, but of course got back to me with “Sorry, nobody else complained and our tests showed our fuel is clean, so we can’t help you”. Of course nobody else complained and your fuel is clean – that’s what your job is to tell me, so I ain’t even mad.  If I were to file a lawsuit, then I’d be potentially out a few thousand dollars and many months of staying on top of it, while swimming upstream against “well, nobody else complained, so what the hell is wrong with your car then?”

Oh well – unless one of you have a better idea, I’m just going to cut my losses at a few hundred bucks, pay off Jamison and Cynthia for their rental car expenses, and file this one under “Don’t Trust the System”.

I took care of the fuel filter in an hour outside of MITERS last week, and based on my (admittedly relatively short) trips around the Boston outer regions, there’s been no problems at all. Maybe it’s time to hit Vermont again for another Ford Fusion battery just to test it on the road for more than an hour at a time, because the New York Maker Faire is next week and I’d certainly like to avoid stranding 5 random freshmen on the side of the road in Connecticut.

Speaking of which, stay tuned for the work on that so far – Chibi-Mikuvan needs some pretty mission critical repairs! Time to switch vans once more….

The Dragon Con 2014 All-Robots Update

Aug 26, 2014 in Bots, Events, Pop Quiz 2, Twelve O'Clocker, Überclocker ADVANCE

Every year, after duckling season, what is it time for? ROBOT SEASON! For the past 2 weeks, I’ve been making repairs and improvements to the (still yet to be settled, mind you…) 2014 fleet for Dragon Con, my annual end-of-summer robot party, as well as helping work on another thing.

This update will be quite short and to-the-point, seeing as how we’re setting out in about 8 hours or so. Robots at the top, panel information at the bottom! Normally, all of this would have come earlier with more interspersed information, but my shop obligations (namely restoring the place from a complete tornado disaster) take priority.

Überclocker

I’d mentioned near the end of Motorama that Clocker desperately needed a new wheel solution, and that I was looking at the Banebots hex-hub wheels to pull off a similar fast-changeable wheel solution like Candy Paint & Gold Teeth.

So I designed just that. A 0.75″ Delrin hex rod chunk functions as both the hub and the wheel bearing. Grooves cut into the hex mount retaining rings to keep everything in line axially.

Notice that those are “duallie” wheels. I decided to go for double wheels because these Banebots wheels are also not known for hard wearing and long lives, so I figured spreading the damage out could help. Clocker would probably burn through a set of singles very quickly, and while these hubs are meant for faster wheel changes, I still don’t want to do that every 2 matches.

The result is that the bot got wider by about an inch total. Not bad, but I still had to remake the axles.

I tried finding Delrin hex material, but it doesn’t seem nearly as common as other plastics in this shape and I’d have to buy 4+ feet from something that wasn’t McMaster-Carr. Well, I need it yesterday so I changed the material to Nylon instead, which is still more than sufficient, and I could buy it in much smaller quantities. Nylon is nice and all, but I still prefer the machining properties of Delrin.

And so the 100th build picture of Überclocker is in in a state of disrepair. I took the lids and most of the drivetrain parts off to inspect everything for damage or required rework. Overall, besides the bent front legs (and totally bald tires), everything is in good shape.

After trying to stretch a traditional circular retaining ring (“circlip”) onto the hex hub, I realized the points of the hex are just too wide to use that style – the legs just bent permanently since the deformation was basically up to the next shaft size. Well a trip to the hardware store netted some E-clips, which slide on from the side. Perfect!

Four duallie wheels made!

I ordered some 7075 aluminum round stock for the new axles and standoffs, since the length I needed was greater than the amount I had remaining from the last build. The four highly polished shafts (1200 grit wet sandpaper, using Tinylathe as the power source) are the wheel axles.

Everything being installed…

With this part finished up, I began restoring the legs. The only thing wrong with them was that the mounting points bent. They’re mounted each hinged on one 1/4-20 cap screw surrounded by a heavily preloaded standoff. Even though this extremely rigid, it still doesn’t like the whole bot bouncing off them. I had to replace the bent bolts and resurface the standoff to be square again.

Furthermore, one of the legs had a broken end roller with the remains of the shoulder screw embedded inside the aluminum leg. After cursing for a while trying to get the stub out, I decided to brute force machine it out and press in a large “insert nut” of sorts.

Removing the broken screw by milling straight down through it…

Making the insert nut, which has a press-fit outer diameter and 5/16-18 threaded ID.

The repaired thread in the leg. This is no longer as strong as the contiguous virgin metal, but it’ll work for now. I ran out of both stock and time to get new leg beams cut out.

Buttoning everything back up!

The ‘glory shot’ for this time around!

I’m highly satisfied with how the new BB wheels handle. What I wasn’t satisfied with was once again how closely I routed the chain to the wheels! I always seem to manage to design a chain drive with a critical but obvious failure owing to me trying to think of chains as precision components.

Nope. Chains are made of ass, and I need to design like ass to use them properly. Oh well.

In this test match between Clocker and Jamison’s somewhat new 30lber (which he’ll certainly update about, right brah?), the right side’s master link clip was torn off by some scrubbing wheel action. The left side’s master link had its retaining clip oriented inwards (away from the wheel). I resolved this by flipping the chain around so the master link clips were all on the inside. I’ve yet to lose another chain, so here is hoping to continued good luck.

Überclocker has no other changes besides the new wheels and the requisite screw tightenings.

Twelve O’Clocker

It’s well known that I have everything in multiple scales, so it’s time to pull out 12 O’clocker again. It did not compete at Motorama 2014 due in part to the lack of a Sportsman’s Class for the 12lbers, so DC2014 will actually be 12 O’Clocker’s second event.

It works fine. Hell, I could have thrown it right back in with no changes at all, but I did want to make a modification to the leg retaining system – specifically, making it actually function. The current leg retaining system is a big washer and standoff, which works fine for the upward direction that the leg is loaded in normaly, but if someone takes a good run at me, the leg gets pushed downwards and props the front of the bot off the ground.

Well, that kind of defeats the point. Here is the new design.

It’s just a clippy thing. That holds the leg from moving in either direction. Cool, huh!?

The profile shape is waterjet-cut, with a single drilled cross-hole. It’s still topologically equivalent to a standoff!

And here they are, installed!

That’s it for 12 O’clocker pictures. What, were you expecting more?

I did make some minor adjustments such as face-machining the leadscrew nut gear to reduce the amount of surface area subjected to sliding. This will hopefully make the arm less likely to “bolt” itself onto an opponent – the motor should always be able to free it up now. I also tightened up the chain drive so it doesn’t, well, Clocker itself.

12 O’Clocker will receive no further mods, since it really has been working the WHOLE TIME!

Pop Quiz 3!

Whoa! I still have this bot!

Last seeing action some time in 2011, it’s been hanging out in a bin I call the Mass Grave of Little Bots since it contains Pop Quiz, Pad Thai, and Colsonbot alike. As well as enough parts for another 2 or 3. I never repaired PQ after DC2011 since I had other bots to tend to, but little bots are always fun to dork around with, and with two working “big” entries (12 and 30lb, anyway… this isn’t 2002 any more where 340lb was “big”…), why not try to revive them?

Pop Quiz won’t be the only 1lb bot I try to revive – the entire Mass Grave is being brought down to Atlanta for some party time at the Georgia Tech Invention Studio. Whatever we all get running will enter, but I will not try too hard on the rest.

As for PQ itself, it’s going to get a complete from-the-ground rebuild, so it’s time to increment the number. I wanted to go directly to Pop Quiz 3.14, but I think I’m past naming bots after silly math jokes now.

Here is an overview of the new design:

Major deltas from the 2011 version: A much, much shorter blade. Titanium top and bottom. And a one-shot 3D printed frame that isn’t made of chunks of smaller prints.

Why the SHORTER blade? Are you crazy? Isn’t robot fighting always about who has the biggest pen0r spinning weapon?

Well, I mean, yes, but the longer the blade, the more likely the bot will just destabilize after a hit or, as Pop Quiz in 2011 did all the time, just hit itself and take off. That’s counterproductive to winning, or doing anything besides flailing around upside-down.

In the past, horizontal blade spinners have won, such as Hazard. Notice how relatively short its blade is – it’s principally a defensive wedge/pusherbot that just happens to have a pimp-slapping device on top of it, not a blade with wheels as so many spinners are designed today. PQ2 was designed this way, and the blade was easily 200% of the bot’s own width. Exacerbated by a lack of rigidity, it was a master of self-eating but not much else.

The blade this time is only 7.5″ across, a little thicker, and made of hardened steel instead of titanium.

I’m also moving it away from a battery disconnect switch to a Fingertech switch to reduce the vulnerability to slicing off its own power wires. Except there’s a problem: The Fingerswitch is too big for this bot. Everything is too big for this bot.

A few minutes of consultation with the designer, Kurt, and some other bot folks, led to this: the integrated Fingertech switch. I was just going to harvest the internals out of a stock switch and insert it into the 3D print file.

Besides this mod, the internals will remain basically the same. In fact, I’m almost straight up transplanting the working electronics from PQ2 into PQ3: Vex #29 controllers for the drive, 7.4v 500mAh lipo battery, and four little Sanyo-esque motors.

I added some small changes to the frame (such as the Integrated Fingertech Switch), but for the most part, this is the 2011 frame, except this time I’ll actually 3DP it in one piece instead of 4.

When I opened the old PQ up, I was greeted by ….. a giant lockwasher? This must have been underweight!

The Spektrum BR6000 seen to the very left (the front of the bot) will be changed out to a Hobbyking 6 channel receiver to match the rest of my objectively downmarket radio system.

The weapon motor. I haven’t been in here in a long time, either. This thing still ran well, and I made no changes to it.

Here’s the new frame, in black ABS plastic!

A few weeks ago, I ordered a bunch of small 500mAh 2S lithium batteries from Hobbyking of the same specification as the old ones. However, the general trend in lithium cells (as reflected in the auto industry, fast food industry, and smartphone industry) has been to get thicker/larger/bigger. I had to un-package the Hobbyking stock battery in order for it to fit in Pop Quiz’s 0.400″ thick frame!

The new top and bottom plate are no longer carbon fiber, but titanium. I caught a great deal on grade 5 Ti sheet on eBay.

I used the MIT Hobby Shop‘s new MicroJet to cut this piece out. It operates above water, so the light show was quite intense!

The steps to finishing Pop Quiz are basically stuffing the electronics and everything back in

So that’s pretty much the state of the bot as it stands now. Again, everything else will be either finished or not finished as we hang out with the GTIS folks, who are apparently also building their own entries this week. Old habits die hard…

Dragon Con 2014 Panels

As per usual in the past few years, I’ll be either hosting or co-hosting a few panels:

  1. Maker Resources: How to take advantage of the great abundance of resources on the Internet to build better things. Obtaining and using CAD programs. Digital fabrication services, 3D printing, waterjetting, electronics design, and so on. Focused on mechanical and electronic projects, and somewhat derived from my 2.00gokart lectures on resources.
  2. Rapid Prototyping Cosplay. With Jamison and Chris Lee, featuring a whole lot of others. How the rise of accessible digital fab processes has spurred the growth of aesthetic and functional costume parts, and how you can get involved.
  3. Electric Vehicles: with myself and Adam Bercu, a rundown on the state of the art in electric vehicle technology in both the commercial/automotive realm and the DIY/hobbyist realm.

More details on these will be released as they get closer. I’m going to try my darndest to get these recorded this year – I say that every year, but I really swear to Baby Robot Jesus this time, guys!!!

I’ll check back in after we’re in the ‘hood.

The Dragon*Con 2013 Complete Roundup, Part II: Event Recap and Maker Resources

Sep 19, 2013 in Bots, colsonbot, Events, mikuvan, Twelve O'Clocker, Überclocker ADVANCE

So here we go – now that Part 1 has had some time to sink in, and now that my shop is looking remotely functional again, it’s time for some part two. In this section will be the two new ‘sections’ (carried over from part 1):

  1. Operation GIVE ME A BRAKE: Brake system and inspection all-around on Mikuvan!
  2. Pad Thai Doodle Ninja, an Antweight 4-bar pushybot I designed and built in like 72 hours!
  3. The trip down, the con, and how the bots did at the event!
  4. The links and documents associated with my two panels at  Dragon*Con.

This semester, the two fabrication labs I oversee in the MIT-SUTD Collaboration is once again playing host to How to Make a Mess out of Almost Anything:

Yeah, it’s going down about like that. Unlike the last two academic terms (January – August, basically), I’m not “running” a class this term, so it’s going to be way more chill. I’m not sure if I will want to run back-to-back design classes again like the consecutive 2.00gokart and “2.00GLP”, since the overall level of intensity and chaos is extremely high. I see how the department can go through design class professors rapid-fire now.

Anyways, back to the trip. It’s Tuesday night! Time to load up robots.

Dragon*Con 2013

…but first, I need to get my 200 pounds of tools, accessories, and spare parts out of the back. I left a spare tire, van-specific tool box (like my robot-specific toolbox, but everything is bigger!), and spare fluids. The floor jack was removed since there is a bottle jack for tire changes in a rear compartment. Basically I was purposefully blocking myself from doing any roadside extensive work – I think I’ve gotten everything mechanically to the point where a failure necessitating deep dissection is practically going to be catastrophic in nature and not something I’m going to do in a parking lot.

Replace all the van kibbles with robot kibbles. I guess I could have kept the van kibbles in the back anyway, since I was initially expecting more bots and parts. This stuffing was, consequently, not as epic as the Motorama Stuffing or the Last Dragon*Con Stuffing (though those vehicle did have less hatch space to begin with). The ship-out time was essentially midnight.

Around 4, we reach Flushing, New York, where Xo Has Joined Your Party. This is where the trip got a little more interesting.

In 2007, before I was a wee bunny at MIT, my parents and I drove up to visit the place. We took I-95 in all of it’s forms through DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Newark & New York City, then up through New Haven and through Rhode Island. My only memories of the trip are of how I-95 was utterly depressing in every way, from tolls to traffic to construction, and the general level of suck the Northeast urban cluster exhibited.

Six years later, I was meandering up the Bruckner Expressway in the wrong direction when I hazily decided that maybe I-95 wasn’t as bad as I remembered. Plus there was like an exit for it right there and if we kept going semi-lost I’d end up back in Connecticut. So, down 95 we went, across the George Washington Bridge (slowly, because construction and late night truck traffic), and down the New Jersey Turnpike, the fancy Delaware Bridge thing, then down onto Baltimore and onwards.

I’m glad to say that 95 is every bit as depressing and repulsive as I remember it and that nobody venturing out of the Northeast to anywhere should ever drive on it for any reason.

All together, I think between Queens and Baltimore I busted $35 on tolls alone, not even including the relatively minor tolls in Massachusetts. Every bridge or turnpike had its own toll authority.

I thought the Interstates were supposed to be full of FREEEEEEEEDOOOOOOOOOOOM.

In the Baltimore-Washington area, I stopped at my favorite IHOP in College Park, MD. This has been the focal point of several Otakon trips. South of Baltimore, we hit what I like to call “Facebook traffic”, where congestion is so bad and traffic is so stop-and-go that everyone is on Facebook complaining about it. This took about 2 hours to sit through because we came in at the exact time to hit traffic in both metro areas. How are you actually supposed to get to work?

We hit Atlanta around 10PM, for a trip duration of essentially 22 hours, many of which were spent fucking around with the abomination that is 95 in the Northeast Corridor. For instance, it took about 45 minutes to even get out of New York. Then factor in the fact that the cruising speed of my lovely pallet of cinder blocks was about 65 to 70mph.

The next day, it was off to the Invention Studio to get the band back together. Here’s the vansnexttothings.tumblr.com shot of the trip:

We journeyed a little off campus to get lunch, and in the parking lot of the local small sketchy college restaurant cluster was an Audi R8. Like most expensive cars, it was parked “haphazardly”.

This year, since I brought actual working robots, and because Pad Thai Doodle Ninja was completed the evening before the con really kicked off, and because I wasn’t trying to speedball an entire new bot in 3 days,I got a lot more wandering and people-watching time. I was especially tuned to try and find people with costumes that looked like they required some amount of mechanical construction or engineering (see my brief on this last year).

That, and giant Totoros.

Here’s a good example. This funky gun-like prop had a ton of lovely CNC aluminum work. The wielder, though, wasn’t the builder.

I spy a little of waterjetting on some of those interior parts!

The thing I’ve historically liked the most about Dragon*Con over other gatherings is that there’s no particular theme. The con covers about every niche of culture, up to and including robots. You’re not even going to find that at PAX or Comic-Con. This enables people to mash together different story universes and characters with much more impunity, for the amusement of all… such as Portalmau5 up there.

I’ll be honest – this is pretty much the only reason I went to the actual con for, besides my own panels. No, not just any group of girls in costume (that’s so last year), but specifically one series. The latest thing I’ve been fanning over is Monty Oum’s RWBY, also known as “Charles has to build shit that Monty designs with ill regard to constant-volume systems”. Most of the characters are Action Girls with giant mechanical transforming weaponry – what’s not to love? The thing that hooked me at the beginning was the RED preview.

The series so far has really pinged my “defer judgement” sense, since to me it seems a little hurried plot-wise and is seemingly laundry-listing TVTropes (site left unlinked because I don’t want to sink everyone’s productivity for the next 11 days) on purpose. But I’m proud of my ability to cherrypick favorites very specifically, so I’m still into the series for the giant mechanical transforming weaponry.

The series is so new that I wasn’t sure if anyone was into it enough to plan costumes, and I wanted to get a sense of what is already out there in terms of mechanically actuated versions. Conclusion? Zero. On the internet, and in real life at the con.

That’s where I come in.

…not right now, though. With Saturday winding down and the Robot Microbattles just around the corner, it was time to intensively practice driving. This was the remains of a laser-cut quadrotor frame that everyone’s 1lbers and 3lbers were beating on throughout the evening. I also repaired Colsonbot by printing a new motor mount carrier and replacing a stripped drive motor.

This year, Microbattles got the entirety of the International ballroom at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. In past years, the event has only gotten half the space, and the audience had to be capped every time. The event size is now on par with the main Robot Battles, with even more entries.

So many, in fact, that single elimination had to be used for the tournaments again, and we still ran overtime. The event has been running against its time limits (and beyond them shamelessly) for the past 2 years, and this year was no different. Hopefully the D*C planning committees finally recognize this.

The Atlanta arena returns! This year, an actual 12″ sanding disc was mounted on the spinning turntable. I’m glad to see that my contraption is still functional. During the event, it produced quite a few light shows from bots being stuck in the hole, and reduced the diameter of a few wheels.

The usual suspects were in attendance. Here’s the table of G3 Robotics & Variable Constant & Guy Who Never Updates His Website.

This is a reasonable approximation of the audience during the day. The added seats and projection screens helped crowding immensely. Because the arena has a pretty high bumper rail (3″ or so), and it’s up on a stage, you can’t actually see the bots from the audience unless something exciting happens, so it’s entirely dependent on the video crew!

microbattles results

Because the Antweight tournament was single elimination, sadly Pad Thai Doodle Ninja only got one match in, against the veteran Segs (pic from years past, to the left). Cynthia put up a valiant driving effort, but the lack of “lifter lip” on the arm meant it had a hard time getting under Segs, and the bot was twice as slow as originally planned.  Near Chaos Robotics, filmer of events, recorded the match in two halves: Part 1, Part 2.

In the rumble, PTDN got into the thick of it and pushed a few people around, then got pinged a few times by DDT. The lifter arm was bent up,  but the bot otherwise had no permanent damage and still drives.

Showing why extending the front armor to the floor might be a bad idea – check out the crimps on the left side. After the DDT damage, the bot had trouble maneuvering on the floor.

Rear view of the damage. Because DDT pinged the arm while it was partially up, the force ripped the rear link out of the arm. That part was extremely thin-walled to begin with and should have been thickened, but I was afraid of it interfering with the robots’ self-righting. Turns out that wasn’t a problem.

I do want to fix up PTDN and upgrade the drives to the original 10:1 spark motors I had intended, and redo the front armor. The lifter servos will either be consolidated into one higher torque metal gear servo, or two digital servos for better range matching.

Colsonbot, sadly, was unable to colson much because of the unrepaired damage from Bot Blast. The “duallie” O-ring wheels were beginning to come apart, and the O-rings tended to slip off and get caught between the shell and the bot. It survived the event pretty much unscathed, however, and I don’t intend on making any big changes to it save for remaking the wheels into single-o-ring affairs that have more ‘stretch’ on the rings themselves to prevent them from twisting out. Colsonbot got in one match against Radiobox, and also the Beetleweight rumble where it was mostly a stationary arena hazard.

big bots

Back in the Invention Studio on Sunday night, preparing for some final tuning and drive testing. Null Hypothesis had to have a drill motor replaced, but otherwise, I didn’t have to do anything to the bots for once.

At the event, while I was testing Null Hypothesis on the stage, it randomly blipped and stopped moving. The cause was traced to the controller completely losing its gate drive power supply for some reason. Whatever the case, it necessitated an in-field replacement, which Adam is handling.

Most of the builders are seasoned & flavored veterans, but there were some rookie builders this year. It’s good to see the sport grow organically, if not somewhat slowly. This bot is an alleged 12lber – according to the builder, it weighed 14 pounds when finished. Oops! And hence, it was named. It ran without any top armor at all – something which ended up causing it to lose to 12 O’Clocker.

Omegaforce returns, with more unique wedge attachments. The outer and inner wedgelets are linked together in such a way that the outer set lifting upwards for any reason causes the inner set to drop down to the ground. The upper wedges can swing all the way backwards. So it’s a multi-tiered defense system against oncoming opponents. The actual functionality was a bit spotty.

Non-rookie builder (I met Miles at Motorama 2013) but first Robot Battles event. The center of this bot was supposed to be a lifter, but some things didn’t happen in time. And yes, it’s entirely made of wood. I was hoping to face this with Überclocker, but didn’t get that chance.

Another rookie bot that was supposed to have an attachment in the middle (in this case, a hammer) but Stuff Didn’t Happen.

Überclocker 30 charging before matches began.

12 O’clocker after its first match, which I won. I learned that the springy legs worked well, but they were not well constrained downwards and could get pushed to the point where the front wheels of the bot were propped off the ground. The contact point they make with the front axle standoff should probably be modified to capture the leg in either direction – up or down.

This is probably the most quintessential robot even picture I’ve ever taken. Equipment all over the table, Mountain Dew everywhere, and “beasting food” as I like to call it strewn about.

 

I try to post audience pictures of Robot Battles every year, because it really is a phenomenal show. I think the audience averages 5 or 600 people and can peak near a thousand. In quite a few years that I remember, the hotel had to deny people entrance because it became standing-room only and exceeded the allowed occupation of the room. Here’s the right half of the audience…

The center…

And the left half.

Oh, this was before matches started.

results

I’m extremely proud of the bots’ performance and reliability this year, as well as the show they put on. For my 10th (!) Robot Battles it’s quite refreshing to have things that worked. The robots ended up losing only due to my own mistakes, or my tendency to favor a good show over winning at this event. I actually can’t bring myself to just drop someone off the edge cleanly with the Clocker pair, and this did bring about my own downfall a few times…

Regardless, Überclocker 30 got 2nd place in the 30lb class, fighting Null Hypothesis (oops…), Overthruster , Null Hypothesis yet again, Jaws – probably my most favorite Clocker match ever, Overthruster for the nth time, and finally losing again to my eternal nemesis Nyx. Overall record of 4/2. There were sure lots of reruns this time around. Clocker was a crowd favorite in the past, and now even more so since it works pretty reliably. At the very end, during the rumble, I did lose the drivetrain completely, most likely due to the solder joints breaking off the motors – this has been a weakness of the bot since Motorama ’13 that I forgot about until now.

12 O’Clocker finished what essentially is 3rd place, since the winners’ bracket finals loser and the losers’ bracket finals winner were the same bot. In the final match, I just got plain outpushed by a more powerful and faster opponent. 12 O’Clocker was also a crowd favorite, possibly more so than Überclocker itself, if I could judge the audience well, and went 3/2.  12 O’Clocker’s match videos: Tetanus Shot 1, Oops, Omegaforce, Apollyon, Tetanus Shot 2

So what’s next for the robots? Besides the odd demo or sparring match, it’s time to make the upgrades for Motorama 2014 next February. Überclocker’s current form debuted this past February at Moto ’13, and I don’t anticipate making any changes to it at all (except for actually using the Quick Disconnect style terminals on the Dewalt motors, maybe…). The new actuator on Überclocker’s clamp worked as I expected – I could grab and hoist up opponents very quickly, and the multistart leadscrew eliminated the binding it was prone to perviously so I no longer had to be gentle with the stick – RageBridge took care of the “endstops” by entering current limiting mode. On 12 O’clocker, I want to better secure the front legs, but otherwise, the bot incurred no damage from this event.

the way up

I decided to be intelligent and finally take a route which I’d been eyeing for years, but never dared try for some reason until now:

In my opinion, this is the most direct possible shot through to New England without going near any metropolitan agglomerations. The plan was to detour north at Charlotte, NC. and follow I-81 all the way up to Motorama Harrisburg, from whence my general solution has been to go east and up-around New York City through 287, then cutting north out of CT on I-91 and I-84. The upper half of this has been tried and verified many times.

I think this was a good decision. Not only was it smooth all the way, but the western VA and NC scenery subtracted from the boredom greatly. We passed through, and stopped in, a few small towns and villages nestled in the Appalachians, places that I’m sure high flying urban folks around here don’t give a shit about. It was, in my view, a more authentic American experience.

Stopping for a fuel and breakfast somewhere north of Roanoke, VA.

daily van bro

I saw something which looked out of place across the street at a convenience store. Turns out it’s a Greenbrier, one of the original American compact vans built to compete with the VW bus! These are rear-engined, just like the VW bus, but the Ford Econoline of the same era was mid-engined and rear wheel drive, and the layout was directly ported and evolved by the Japanese. So, really this is an evolutionary ancestor to Mikuvan.

It was also on sale. I called up the seller, but sadly the price asked was out of what I had in my pocket at the time. If I were into these things, though, it would be a very fair price for a vehicle in as good visual condition, and as good running condition as the seller described.

Compared to almost all modern cars, I’m pretty damned small, but the Greenbrier was somehow even smaller. And it had 3 rows of bench seats.

The rest of the trip up through Harrisburg and beyond was pretty standard. We arrived back in around 1:30 AM (that is, 0130EDT Wednesday 9/4). And so that concludes Dragon*Con 2013. A pretty delightful adventure filled with working robots and now-most-definitely-working vans.

Well, okay, I did have to rebuild my A/C blower motor again, in the Georgia Tech parking lot. Remember those brushes I installed? They were backwards, and they ate through the copper bus wire after a few thousand miles. A random 200W scooter motor turned out to have the exact same size brushes, and saved the day.

Maker Panel 2013

Here’s where I (finally) post the presentation from the 2013 Maker Resources panel, and some related links, in one place! The panel happened on Friday evening at 7PM, and I had a pretty full house for most of it. Unfortunately I once again neglected to bring my video camera to the event, but I did notice quite a few folks taking video. If you have some high quality video of the panel, I’d like to include it here.

The panel was broader in scope than just “where to buy stuff” which I did in 2012. It put more emphasis on CAD software and transferring designs to parts using digital fabrication techniques (waterjets, lasers, etc.), and in general how to design better things. I tried to include some CAD program demos of stuff like Sketchup, freeCAD, and Solidworks/Inventor, but I actually ran so far over time that the director had to step in and cut me off (Sorry Val!). Maybe next year.

Also included as part of side discussion were the slides from last year with general parts & resources.

Here’s the list of stuff I said I’d put up like two weeks ago: